2018-04-15 / Community

Embrace aging and all it can be

By ZAFFIE HADIARIS
Columnist

“The good news…is that people can benefit from even moderate levels of physical activity.”  Surgeon General of the United States

Each year U.S. hospitals have 300,000 admissions for broken hips, and falling is the cause of most of these fractures.

There is an increasing scientific interest in the cause of age–related declines and disease. The study of biological changes with age in tissues, organs and specific body systems may lead to new treatments and new interventions.

Enormous progress is being made about what we know, and what we have yet to find out about growing older. Research has already contributed to the revolution in longevity. We want to embrace aging and make it the best it can be.

Research at the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers targets one fear people have most about growing older, the decline of physical function and lost on independence. The Center has a special mission to bring scientist from all disciplines into aging research and train the next generation of investigators in the field.  

The good news is that exercising is just a step away. As we get older, we have to adjust to our advancing years. We have to do exercising that is appropriate for our age and physical condition.

We can all be healthy and productive seniors in our advancing years.

Our community has many organizations that are doing a wonderful job of making wellness easy to understand and obtain. Four kinds of exercise and physical activities improve health and physical ability: endurance, strength, balance and flexibility.  Some activities fit into several categories. 

Many endurance activities help build strength, and strength exercise can help improve balance. It seems falling is a common problem in older adults. Exercises like standing on one foot, heel to toe walk, Tai Chi, balance walk and more improve balance. 

The Saco Park and Recreation Seniority Program, “All About Balance,” is a senior exercise class to reduce your fall risk.

This is a six-week class with a different topic each week. Class 4, Vestibular Class, was held on Wednesday April 11 and on April 18, a Sensation Class will be held at Saco Community Center, Room 100. Free to drop in from 9:30 to 10:30 a,m.

This program is presented by the Maine Strong Balance Center, a Physical Therapy Clinic that is dedicated to treat balance.

Therapist Sarah Burnham PT, DPT can be reached at 303-0612 or Sarah@MaineStrongBalance Center.com

Tai Chi Chih classes will be held on the last two Tuesdays of April at Saco Parks and Recreation.

Exercise will preserve health and excite, fulfill and nurture us. Learning new things is continuous stimulation.

For those of you who are interested in exercising for health, sociability, and fun follow the SENIORity Program at Saco Parks & Recreation.

For more information and to register visit: www.sacorec.com or 283-3139.


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